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1. Employee Records 1.1. Employee Hire Records 1.2. Hourly Employee Manual 1.3. Salaried Employee Manual 1.4. Supplemental   1.4.1. Understanding Annual W-2   1.4.2. Designated Beneficiary   1.4.3. Contract Employees
2. Payroll Processing -Policies 2.1. Time in a Box Clock 2.2. Salaried Policy & Procedures 2.3. Departments 2.4. Employment Termination 3. Employee Benefits 3.1. Voluntary Employee Insurance
3.3. Savings Program 3.4. Garnishments 3.5. 401K Program      • Pension Protection Act of 2006 3.6. Charities 4. Employee Safety 4.1. Policies
4.3. Mandated Documentation   4.3.1. First Injury Report   4.3.2. OSHA Log   4.3.3. Worker’s Right to Know Act 4.4. Worker’s Compensation 4.5. Safety Committee 5. Records
COMPANY INTRANET
HIRING FOREIGN WORKERS
Human Resource > Hiring > Hiring Foreign Workers
Illegal Alien Employment Act How do employers make sure they are not hiring illegal aliens who have fake documentation? Employers currently are obligated under federal law to have proper documentation for each employee.  Under federal law, employers are required to utilize lawful resident verification information under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.  The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services of the Department of Homeland Security requires documentation for employment eligibility for recording on the mandatory I-9 forms that all employers must keep for each employee.  These documentation requirements also can be used to satisfy compliance requirements under the new law regarding license revocation. The documents sufficient to establish both identity and employment eligibility include 1) a U.S. Passport, whether current or expired; 2). A permanent resident card or alien registration receipt card (Form I-551);  An unexpired Employment Authorization Document (I-766); 3).  An unexpired foreign passport with a temporary I-551 stamp;  4) An unexpired employment authorization document that contains a photograph; and 5) An unexpired foreign passport with an unexpired Arrival-Departure record, Form I- 94, bearing the same name as the passport and containing an endorsement of the alien's nonimmigrant status, if that status authorizes the alien to work for the employer. Furthermore, there are several other documents that can be provided in combination to meet both the identity and eligibility requirements.  These documents are identified in lists B and C on the revised I-9 forms, which are accessible on the USCIS web site. See Details for I-9 Additionally, a federal electronic work authorization verification service is provided by the United States Department of Homeland Security pursuant to the federal Basic Pilot Program Extension and Expansion Act of 2003. For more information on this voluntary program go to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Web site .
E-Verify from the Department of Homeland Security Helps Employers Meet their Form I-9 Compliance Responsibilities E-Verify is a free government service to  verify, via the Internet, the employment  eligibility status of newly-hired  employees. E-Verify (formerly known as  the Basic Pilot/Employment Eligibility  Verification Program) is administered by  the U.S. Department of Homeland  Security (DHS) in partnership with the  Social Security Administration (SSA).  The goals of E-Verify are to reduce  unauthorized employment, minimize  verification-related discrimination, be  quick and non-burdensome to  employers, and protect the privacy and  civil liberties of employees. For more  information visit:   http://www.dhs.gov/eev 
1. What causes delays when foreign workers apply for Social Security numbers?   When foreign workers apply for Social Security numbers, SSA verifies their documents directly with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Most applications are verified immediately, but there can be delays. Social Security understands that this process may affect companies who hire foreign workers, but direct verification from DHS is vital to ensuring the integrity of the Social Security number. 2. What are an employer's responsibilities when hiring foreign workers who don't have Social Security numbers?   Advise workers that they are required to apply for a Social Security number and card. If a worker applied for but has not yet received a Social Security number, you should get the following information as complete as possible: The worker's full name, address, date of birth, place of birth, father's full name, mother's full maiden name, gender and the date he or she applied for a Social Security number. 
3. What if the worker doesn't have a Social Security number when wage reports (Forms W-2) are due to Social Security?   Electronic Filers: If the worker applied for a card but didn't receive the number in time for filing, enter all zeros in the field for the Social Security number.   Paper Filers: If the worker applied for a card but didn't receive the number in time for filing, enter "Applied For" in Box a. Remember to instruct the worker to tell you the number and the exact name printed on the card, when it is received. 4. My foreign worker received his or her Social Security number after I filed my wage report. What do I do?   When you receive the worker's Social Security number, file Form W- 2c (Corrected Wage and Tax Statement), to show the worker's number. Go to www.socialsecurity.gov/employer/pub.htm for instructions on filing W-2c’s.
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1. Employee Records 1.1. Employee Hire Records 1.2. Hourly Employee Manual 1.3. Salaried Employee Manual 1.4. Supplemental   1.4.1. Understanding Annual W-2   1.4.2. Designated Beneficiary   1.4.3. Contract Employees  
2. Payroll Processing -Policies 2.1. Time in a Box Clock 2.2. Salaried Policy & Procedures 2.3. Departments 2.4. Employment Termination 3. Employee Benefits 3.1. Voluntary Employee Insurance 3.2. Cafeteria Plan (IRC Section 125)
3.3. Savings Program 3.4. Garnishments 3.5. 401K Program      • Pension Protection Act of 2006 3.6. Charities 4. Employee Safety 4.1. Policies 4.2. Substance Abuse
4.3. Mandated Documentation   4.3.1. First Injury Report   4.3.2. OSHA Log   4.3.3. Worker’s Right to Know Act 4.4. Worker’s Compensation 4.5. Safety Committee 5. Records 5.1. Government Poster Requirements 5.2. Maintenance of Short-Term Documents 5.3. Archive Maintenance
COMPANY INTRANET
HIRING FOREIGN WORKERS
Human Resource > Hiring > Hiring Foreign Workers
Illegal Alien Employment Act How do employers make sure they are not hiring illegal aliens who have fake documentation? Employers currently are obligated under federal law to have proper documentation for each employee.  Under federal law, employers are required to utilize lawful resident verification information under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986.  The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services of the Department of Homeland Security requires documentation for employment eligibility for recording on the mandatory I-9 forms that all employers must keep for each employee.  These documentation requirements also can be used to satisfy compliance requirements under the new law regarding license revocation. The documents sufficient to establish both identity and employment eligibility include 1) a U.S. Passport, whether current or expired; 2). A permanent resident card or alien registration receipt card (Form I-551);  An unexpired Employment Authorization Document (I-766); 3).  An unexpired foreign passport with a temporary I-551 stamp; 4) An unexpired employment authorization document that contains a photograph; and 5) An unexpired foreign passport with an unexpired Arrival- Departure record, Form I-94, bearing the same name as the passport and containing an endorsement of the alien's nonimmigrant status, if that status authorizes the alien to work for the employer. Furthermore, there are several other documents that can be provided in combination to meet both the identity and eligibility requirements.  These documents are identified in lists B and C on the revised I-9 forms, which are accessible on the USCIS web site. See Details for I-9 Additionally, a federal electronic work authorization verification service is provided by the United States Department of Homeland Security pursuant to the federal Basic Pilot Program Extension and Expansion Act of 2003. For more information on this voluntary program go to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Web site .
E-Verify from the Department of Homeland Security Helps Employers Meet their Form I-9 Compliance Responsibilities E-Verify is a free government service to verify, via the  Internet, the employment eligibility status of newly-hired  employees. E-Verify (formerly known as the Basic  Pilot/Employment Eligibility Verification Program) is  administered by the U.S. Department of Homeland  Security (DHS) in partnership with the Social Security  Administration (SSA). The goals of E-Verify are to reduce  unauthorized employment, minimize verification-related  discrimination, be quick and non-burdensome to  employers, and protect the privacy and civil liberties of  employees. For more information visit:   http://www.dhs.gov/eev 
1. What causes delays when foreign workers apply for Social Security numbers?   When foreign workers apply for Social Security numbers, SSA verifies their documents directly with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Most applications are verified immediately, but there can be delays. Social Security understands that this process may affect companies who hire foreign workers, but direct verification from DHS is vital to ensuring the integrity of the Social Security number. 2. What are an employer's responsibilities when hiring foreign workers who don't have Social Security numbers?   Advise workers that they are required to apply for a Social Security number and card. If a worker applied for but has not yet received a Social Security number, you should get the following information as complete as possible: The worker's full name, address, date of birth, place of birth, father's full name, mother's full maiden name, gender and the date he or she applied for a Social Security number. 
3. What if the worker doesn't have a Social Security number when wage reports (Forms W-2) are due to Social Security?   Electronic Filers: If the worker applied for a card but didn't receive the number in time for filing, enter all zeros in the field for the Social Security number.   Paper Filers: If the worker applied for a card but didn't receive the number in time for filing, enter "Applied For" in Box a. Remember to instruct the worker to tell you the number and the exact name printed on the card, when it is received. 4. My foreign worker received his or her Social Security number after I filed my wage report. What do I do?   When you receive the worker's Social Security number, file Form W-2c (Corrected Wage and Tax Statement), to show the worker's number. Go to www.socialsecurity.gov/employer/pub.htm for instructions on filing W-2c’s.
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